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Abstract

In 2006, Michigan changed their traditional merit award to a credit contingent program based upon successful completion of 60 college credits. The Michigan Promise Scholarship was crafted by state policymakers without input from the financial aid community. This case study suggests that the change in policy resulted in two unintended consequences: 1. an administrative burden for financial aid offices resulting from the award verification process and 2. a financial burden for students during the year they are expected to be eligible for the award. The Scholarship was eliminated in 2011, but this case is illustrative for other states seeking to align financial aid with college completion.

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